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Tip of the Week #9

Plain soap is just as good as antibacterial soap in preventing infections, but does not lead to antibiotic resistance.  There is no advantage in using antibacterial soap.

Tip of the Week #8

There is no need to use antibacterial soap! Antibacterial soap attacks all bacteria, both good and bad, and can cause bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics. Plain soap effectively removes bad germs from the skin without leading to antibiotic resistance.

Tip of the Week #7

Expect your doctor, dentist, nurse or therapist to wash their hands before they examine you.

Tip of the Week #13

Colds, flu, croup, laryngitis and most cases of bronchitis in children and adults are due to viruses. Antibiotics will not help!

Tip of the Week #11

Viruses are more contagious than bacteria. If more than one person in your family has the same illness, odds are it is a viral infection, and antibiotics will not work!

Tip of the Week #25

Fifty percent of children who have ear infections will still have fluid behind the eardrum after one month. This is not a reason to give antibiotics.

Tip of the Week #26

In patients with viral bronchitis, 45% still have a cough after two weeks, and 25% still have a cough after three weeks. Be patient; it takes a long time for your body to get over a virus.

Tip of the Week #32

Antiseptics are products that kill germs on the skin. Hand sanitizers are actually antiseptics. Be sure to use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol as the only active ingredient.

Tip of the Week #33

Soaps and detergents lift dirt, grease and germs and allow them to be rinsed away. Soaps have natural fats and oils whereas detergents are synthetic. Use plain soaps and detergents that do not contain antibacterial ingredients.

Tip of the Week #44

Older persons are likely to have bacteria in their bladders without having an infection. This is a normal condition of aging and does not need to be treated with antibiotics unless there are specific symptoms of a urinary tract infection.